Author: Aaren DeJong


Eventually my path converged on Application Delivery, Deployment and Support (essentially, Tier3 - Applications) in the same company. This is where my twitch began to calm, as I was able to get closer to the inner-workings of what made Linux shine for enterprise applications. It wasn’t easy at first, but though some coaching and networking with colleagues, much of the work wasn’t always work to me. This is when things like Apache, Python, Bash and Git became my tools of the trade (there was a little PHP and MySQL, but I can’t call myself a LAMP expert).

Outside of the office at this point, becoming familiar with much of the Red Hat portfolio for RHEL and RHEV (RHV) (oVirt was very helpful, yes) was clearly healthy for me, if I wanted to breach into something beyond applications and into infrastructure.

Around this time I came across Ansible (open source)… It was an eye-opener, being able to use very English-like YAML to “script” actions to servers, many at a time, and able to turn infra and applications deployment into code.. timing seemed to be just right.

Having made the initial time investment to understand it and with some help from the delightful LinuxAcademy, I brought Ansible and oVirt (or RHV) with me as tools of the trade whenever I was part of a systems administrator team or similar.

The final twitch was around the time I left the last employer and sought for something that would let me build my latest skills into what we’re all calling “dev-ops” today. Perhaps it’s opportune to anticipate that we “dev-ops” people will likely be akin to “cloud engineers” rather soon.

A previous engagement brought me closer to understanding the case and tech for GlusterFS (even though I was under the impression that OpenZFS/ ZFS on Linux was the last filesystem we’d ever need.. and I still believe it!).

Anyhow, with the linking of my system administrator experience and tools like Gluster and Ansible so popularly proliferating, through related searches I came across Arctiq’s website during a job hunt, and, to be honest, I wasn’t yet sure I was made of the stuff they were looking for. I figured ‘dev-ops’ was not concerned with infrastructure as much as I am.

With a nudge from my ever-reminding technology twitch, I sent them an application, and nearly a month later, here we are. Oh man, what did I get myself into! We play a large part in bringing open-source to enterprise with dev-ops culture and I really enjoy it. Somehow there was a part of me that wanted to always have a new customer to show Ansible to, or host a meetup about the future of software defined networking (which we did!.. more in a future blog post!), or help the team do tedious blog migrations into GitHub.io (NEVER AGAIN… heh, just kidding.. … ?). This is my career in fifth-gear. Now that I think about it, with electric cars on the rise, I will need to re-title this post.. but maybe another time, because we’re busy helping business take advantage of new tools and modern processes.

//Take the first step

This tag-line works for me, because had I never followed my twitch to break into I.T. when I did, there’s a strong chance I might never have met the great team at Arctiq.

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